Sustainable Development in Government: 5 Strategies for Implementing EO 13834

sustainable development government
Sustainable development in government is achievable with the right strategies for implementing EO 13834

Is your government agency sustainable?

If not, it should be.

President Trump signed Executive Order (E.O.) 13834 on May 17th, 2018 and it “directs Federal agencies to manage their buildings, vehicles, and overall operations to optimize energy and environmental performance, reduce waste, and cut costs.”

The Federal government is leading the way on this initiative for sustainable development in government and has achieved substantial energy savings (which we’ll review later in this post).

To help you meet the standards outlined in EO 13834, we’ll tell you what outcomes your agency is expected to achieve, when you’re expected to achieve them, and a few easy ways to begin developing a sustainable government agency.

What Are the Goals of Executive Order 13834?

EO 13834 sets forth 8 goals that the head of each federal agency is expected to meet in the most cost-effective way possible.

These are the goals of EO 13834:

  1. Achieve and maintain annual reductions in building energy use and implement energy efficiency measures that reduce costs.
  2. Meet statutory requirements relating to the consumption of renewable energy and electricity.
  3. Reduce potable and non-potable water consumption, and comply with stormwater management requirements.
  4. Utilize performance contracting to achieve energy, water, building modernization, and infrastructure goals.
  5. Ensure that new construction and major renovations conform to applicable building energy efficiency requirements and sustainable design principles; consider building efficiency when renewing or entering into leases; implement space utilization and optimization practices; and annually assess and report on building conformance to sustainability metrics.
  6. Implement waste prevention and recycling measures and comply with all Federal requirements with regard to solid, hazardous, and toxic waste management and disposal.
  7. Acquire, use, and dispose of products and services, including electronics, in accordance with statutory mandates for purchasing preference, Federal Acquisition Regulation requirements, and other applicable Federal procurement policies.
  8. Track and, as required by section 7(b) of this order, report on energy management activities, performance improvements, cost reductions, greenhouse gas emissions, energy and water savings, and other appropriate performance measures.

When Do You Need to Achieve the goals of EO 13834?

Unlike Obama’s sustainable development in government policies, which was supposed to carry through 2025 (but was rescinded to make way for EO 13834), President Trump didn’t set deadlines for his energy-saving executive order.

Without concrete timetables, federal agencies are free to meet the goals of EO 13834 on their own time, in a way that best suits their budget and other needs.

How’s the Federal Government Doing in Sustainable Development?

The Office of Federal Sustainability has compiled a “scorecard” on federal agency performances regarding energy efficiency and sustainability.  

Every agency had their fiscal year 2016 performance assessed according to the goals set forth by Obama’s sustainable development executive order.

The Office of Federal Sustainability will update their metrics to conform to President Trump’s Executive Order 13834 proposals when assessing these agencies for fiscal year 2017.

Even still, these scorecards give a good indication of how well the federal government is doing in regards to sustainable development.

For example, here’s how the U.S. Department of Energy did on their scorecard:

  • For Scope 1&2 GHG Reduction Target of 50.0% by 2025: 42.3% reduction in 2016 and on target
  • For Scope 3 GHG Reduction Target of 25.0% by 2025: 19.3% reduction in 2016 and on track
  • Reduction in energy intensity in goal-subject facilities compared with 2015: 9.4% and on track
  • Use of renewable electricity as a percent of facility electricity use: 24.1% from renewable sources and on track for 30% by 2025
  • Use of clean energy as a percent of facility energy use: 22.6% of federal building electric energy and thermal energy is clean energy and on track
  • Reduction in potable water intensity compared with 2007: 29.3% and on track for 36% in 2025

While not all government agencies have achieved as much progress in sustainable development as the U.S. Department of Energy, they’re all undertaking initiatives to meet their sustainable development goals – which should inspire you to do the same.

Strategies You Can Implement for Sustainable Development in Government

The U.S. General Services Administration (GSA) recently announced their Strategic Plan for Fiscal Years 2018-2022 which emphasizes saving taxpayer money through the more efficient management of federal real estate.

They revealed a few of their strategies for successfully reducing energy and increasing efficiency, such as:

  • Monitoring temperature settings, operating schedules, and routine maintenance.
  • Installation of LED lights and low-flow water fixtures as part of smaller renovations.
  • Disposal and congressionally-funded renovation of older buildings and construction of more-efficient new buildings.

In addition to GSA’s strategies, we’ve compiled a few more below that you can implement today to kickstart (or embolden) your government sustainability development initiatives.

Create a Team

You can’t turn a government agency green on your own. You’re going to need the help of a dedicated team of individuals who share the same goals and vision for an eco-friendly office and organization.

Plus, one of the biggest benefits of creating a “green” team is employees can better inspire fellow employees than a top-down announcement or memo from management can.  

Reduce Consumption of Office Supplies

Once you have a team, you can implement projects for them to oversee, such as the reduction in office supplies consumption.

Tiny changes like this are a great way to begin a sustainable development program and can substantially decrease the amount of waste that would otherwise end up in a landfill.

Use Energy-Efficient Lighting

According to the U.S. Department of Energy, By 2027, widespread use of LEDs could save about 348 TWh (compared to no LED use) of electricity: This is the equivalent annual electrical output of 44 large electric power plants (1000 megawatts each), and a total savings of more than $30 billion at today’s electricity prices.

If you want to cash in on those savings, you can easily swap your incandescent light bulbs for LED, halogen, or compact fluorescent light bulbs.

But before you toss your inefficient light bulbs in the trash, make sure to recycle them at a local Batteries Plus store or other light bulb recycling facility.

Dispose of Electronic Waste

Light bulbs aren’t the only thing in your office you should dispose of properly, almost all of your electronics, inks, and toners should be recycled as well.

The EPA has a handy list of all the places that will accept your electronic waste and Earth 911 allows you to search your area for the nearest ink and toner recycling facility.

Go as Paperless as Possible

According to the EPA and the Clean Air Council, The average office worker in the U.S. uses 10,000 sheets of paper.

While going completely paperless is probably impossible for your government agency, you can take the following steps to get closer to a paperless office:

Sustainable Development in Government Beyond EO 13834

The goals of Executive Order 13834 are admirable, and should absolutely be pursued.

But the sustainable development of government shouldn’t just be about following a mandated set of policies. It should be about striving to use the taxpayer’s money wisely, decreasing your carbon footprint, and actually caring about preserving the environment.

You’ll need more education and information beyond the tips we provided here to meet the expectations of EO 13834 and to pursue sustainability goals beyond them.

We’ve created a number of courses, ebooks, and videos to help you implement an optimal sustainability development plan.

Some of these include:

  • Sustainable Development for Public Administration
  • Sustainable Logistics and Supply Chain Management: Principles and Practices for Sustainable Operations and Management
  • Advanced Sustainable Lighting Design – Reports
  • Sustainable Building Technology
  • Characteristics of a Sustainable Organization

And much, much more.

If you want to get your hands on these resources and many others, then sign up for a free 14-day trial of Enterprise Training below.

Experience the proven, easy-to-use, and cost-effective benefits of online training by scheduling your free online training consultation today!Schedule Free Consultation

10 Important Government Facilities Management Trends in 2018

The Government facilities management trends in 2018 will encourage new technologies and responsibilities for FMs
The Government facilities management trends in 2018 will encourage new technologies and responsibilities for FMs

From the public sector to the private, facilities managers roles and responsibilities are changing.

It used to be about simple building maintenance.

Now it’s about construction planning, energy management, and workforce efficiency.

We’ll help you navigate the changing face of facilities management by going over 7 Government facilities management trends in 2018.

But before we do, let’s clearly define facilities management.

What is Facilities Management?

According to the International Facility Management Association (IFMA), facilities management is:

A profession that encompasses multiple disciplines to ensure functionality of the built environment by integrating people, place, process, and technology.

A facilities manager (FM) is responsible for making sure the building and everything in it (people and objects) function properly and harmoniously.

IFMA has laid out 11 core competencies that every facilities manager should acquire:

  1. Communications – Management and oversight of the development and use of the facility communications plan
  2. Quality – Development and management of the creation and application of standards for the facility organization
  3. Technology – Ability to plan, direct and manage/oversee facility management business and operational technologies
  4. Operations and Maintenance –  Ability to assess and manage the conditions and operations of the facility
  5. Human Factors – Development and implementation of practices that support the performance and goals of the entire organization
  6. Finance and Business – Management and oversight of the financial management of the facility organization
  7. Emergency Planning and Business Continuity – Plan, manage and support the entire organization’s emergency preparedness program
  8. Leadership and Strategy – Ability to lead the facility organization, plan strategically, and assess the services needed to meet organizational requirements
  9. Real Estate and Property Management –  Ability to develop and implement the real estate master plan
  10. Project Management – Ability to plan and oversee projects
  11. Environmental Stewardship and Sustainability – Ability to plan, manage and support the entire organization’s commitment to protecting the environment

With these skills, a facilities manager can ensure the successful operation of the building and everything in it.

Beyond these skills, there are new tools and methods for facilities management that are being developed every year.

Below, you’ll find the newest emerging facilities management trends in 2018 for the public sector (although they apply to the private sector as well).

Government Facilities Management Trends in 2018

Increased Demand for Outsourcing

In 2013, over half of facilities management was outsourced in North America, according to Global Industry Analysts, Inc.

This is attributed to the cost-benefit of outsourcing – it’s simply cheaper to hire an outside facilities manager than to train one in-house.

If you’re on a tight budget, consider outsourcing as a cost-effective solution to the rising cost of in-house managers.

The Internet of Things is More Important Than Ever

The Internet of Things (IoT) is taking over the world, and facilities management is not exempt from its conquest.

Facilities managers have LiFi, smart meters, and cloud-based HVAC systems at their disposal to totally control the energy output of their buildings.

IoT is set to be one of those Government facilities management trends that will continue to be relevant in the years to come, so pay close attention to this one.

More Regulations Requiring the Implementation of “Green Technology”

47 states and a few territories and cities use the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) as a model for operating their facilities. It’s adopted in accordance with the regions Governmental codes, but sets a standard by which regions can regulate effective facilities managers.

The 2018 IECC will focus much more on energy-efficient technologies and systems – emphasizing ease of use and conservation.

This facilities management trend towards greener technology means that FMs will be required to track their buildings energy inefficiencies, and consider newer, better upgrades and installations for less costly energy emissions.

Increased Use of Building Information Modeling

Since 2003, when the U.S. General Services Administration first rolled out the 3D and 4D Building Information Modeling (BIM) program, it’s become even more commonplace.

BIM expands the role of facilities managers from maintenance to design and construction. If your facilities managers aren’t using this in your Government buildings yet, they need to start.

Increased Mobility of Workers and Managers

Another technology-driven facilities management trend is the ability of FMs to manage assets and collaborate with coworkers from anywhere at anytime.

With the rise of rugged devices such as thermal imaging cameras and tracking devices, there’s no longer an excuse to operate remote buildings without connectivity.

Location-based services (LBS) also help evolve the role of FMs. Through LBS, FMs can get up-to-date inventory data on supplies for multiple sites and facilitate ordering.

Increased Need for Government Leadership Development and Government Succession Planning

According to Jones Lange LaSalle, the average age of facilities managers is 49, while the general working population average mean age is 43.

Here’s the worst part:

Less than 1% of millennials are planning a career in facilities management.

This means facilities managers are creeping toward retirement and no one will fill their positions.

To counteract this trend, you should increase your Government leadership development and implement a strong Government succession plan.

Transformed Work Environment for Increased Productivity

Facilities managers are now expected to keep up with workplace design trends.

Workplace design plays a pivotal role in attracting and maintaining millennial employees, and both Governments and corporations have a vested interest in keeping their employees as long as possible.

From open-seated areas to quiet spaces to cafes, FMs will be tasked with creating unique spaces that increase employee engagement and productivity.

Integrated Systems for Greater FM Productivity

2018 will be the year of productivity, both for how buildings are designed and for how facilities managers perform their job.

Instead of separate tools and methods for executing tasks like estimating, bidding, or reporting, FM’s will be expected to use powerful software that delivers real-time, data-driven insights.

Big Data Driving Facilities Management

As in most other industries, big data is necessary for driving measurable improvements.

Collecting and analyzing data can help facilities managers detect future power outages and equipment failure.

It can also help FM’s achieve greater energy efficiency by detecting and mapping energy consumption patterns and wasteful practices or equipment.

The more information an FM has about their building the performance of the technology installed in the building, the better decisions the FM can make to decrease costs and improve performance.

Operational Excellence is More Important Than Ever

Facilities managers have to achieve operational excellence in 2018 and beyond or risk losing millions of dollar.

According to the CBRE Institute, there are 3 ways FM’s can drive operational excellence:

  • Efficient cost management and value creation: accomplished through cost reductions, cost avoidance, and risk management initiatives.
  • Maintaining high occupant and client satisfaction: accomplished by managing occupancy, providing safe and functional work environments and providing ap­propriate property or campus amenities.
  • Proactively stewarding property and infrastructure: accomplished through adopting disciplined approach­es to corrective maintenance, preventative maintenance, and customer requests.

Government Facilities Management Requires Cutting-Edge Training

If you’re a budding Government facilities manager or in charge of developing facilities managers, then you know that training is essential.

All Government FMs must be Federal Buildings Personnel Training Act (FBPTA) compliant.

We can help you do that.

From the basics of facilities management to sustainable energy efficiency, we provide authorized training to help you or your employees become FBPTA trained.

We’ll even provide LEED certification and completion certificates.

If you want to keep up with Government facilities management trends, then check out Enterprise Training below.

Experience the proven, easy-to-use, and cost-effective benefits of online training by scheduling your free online training consultation today!

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