The Top 5 Cybersecurity Threats to Schools (And How You Combat Them)

 

Cybersecurity threats hacked code
Cybersecurity threats in schools are growing and demand immediate attention to protect everyone’s sensitive information.

Since January of 2016, there have been 418 cybersecurity Incidents (and counting) in K-12 schools across the United States.

That number will continue climbing if schools don’t tighten their IT security.

But why are hackers targeting schools?

Well, according to Mary Kavaney, the chief operating officer of the Global Cyber Alliance, “school environments often don’t have a lot of technology resources dedicated to security, but have some of the richest personal information on people, including social security numbers, birth dates, and, potentially, medical and financial information.”

She went on to say, “If bad actors can access student [personal data], that information can be exploited for the purpose of fraud and committing crimes for years before it is detected. It’s often only upon application for a job, or application for financial aid to attend college that students find out that their social security number has been used fraudulently — they may have poor credit due to false applications against their history, or worse, find that crime has been committed in their name.”

To solve this problem, schools first have to know what techniques cyberattackers use to hack their school.

The Top Cybersecurity Threats Facing Schools

According to CoSN (the Consortium for School Networking), there are 5 major cybersecurity threats schools need to be aware of. They are:

Phishing

We wrote about phishing in this post on cybersecurity tips for employees. It’s one of the most effective and dangerous hacking techniques.

Phishing is simple: a hacker sends an email pretending to be someone they’re not (like a personal acquaintance, coworker, vendor, etc.) and usually asks you to click a link within the email. The link will install malware on your system and allow the hacker to access personal information or creep from your computer to someone else’s to access your data.

DDoS

DDoS attacks are another favorite of cyberattackers.

It works like this: hackers build a network of infected computers (botnets) and use them to flood your server with traffic, crashing it. While your data won’t be stolen, it can certainly be lost, along with plenty of worker productivity, and money, as a result.

Data Breach

A data breach is the big one everyone should worry about, for good reason. It’s how hackers steal identities, credit cards, and any other valuable information that can be abused or sold.

According to the Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC), “The number of U.S. data breach incidents tracked in 2017 hit a new record high of 1,579 breaches.” That means there’s been a “44.7% increase over the record high figures reported for 2016.”

Ransomware

Ransomware is one of the scariest cybersecurity threats out there. Hackers infiltrate your computer (through other techniques like phishing) and then encrypt your data and require you to pay a ransom to regain access to the data.

The most infamous ransomware is WannaCry, which infiltrated over 200,000 computers in 150 countries in 2017.

IoT Vulnerabilities

The “Internet of Things” (IoT) is a growing line of devices, appliances, and other objects that are connected to the internet. From watches to coffee grinders to thermostats, these little machines offer new innovations and many more dangers.

Many IoT devices aren’t regularly updated and often lack the security measures required to prevent hacking attempts.

How to Combat Cybersecurity Threats in Schools

Schools are vulnerable, as we’ve made abundantly clear in this post.

But you can protect your school, your students, and your data from hackers.

One way to do it:

Train K-12 students in cybersecurity.

This gets students involved in hunting for cybersecurity solutions and potentially prevents some students from launching their own hacking attacks against their school.

Plus, they may be able to help administrators ward off attacks.

The only thing needed is an on-demand portal where students can learn basic and advanced cybersecurity skills in the classroom, the bedroom, or on the go.

Enterprise Solutions can be that portal.

We offer books, videos, and courses on topics such as:

  • Cybersecurity and Cyberwar: What Everyone Needs To Know
  • Cybersecurity: Public Sector Threats and Responses
  • Implementing the NIST Cybersecurity Framework

And much more.

To get started, claim your free 14-day trial of Enterprise Systems below.

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What Is CISSP Certification and How Do You Get It?

What is cissp certification
To answer the question of what is CISSP certification you should know why it’s important.

CISSP certification is #1 on the list of the 8 most in-demand IT certifications, according to CIO.com.

And Burning Glass reported that “the demand for certified cybersecurity talent is outstripping supply. In the U.S., employers posted 49,493 jobs requesting a CISSP, recruiting from a pool of only 65,362 CISSP holders nationwide.”

This spells out huge opportunities for motivated IT professionals who want to work in the private sector and public sector because even the Department of Defense considers CISSP certification one of the lead qualifiers for getting hired in their department.

If you’re interested in earning this prestigious certification, let’s look at what CISSP is, how to get certified, and how to start preparing for the CISSP exam today.

What is CISSP Certification?

CISSP certification was developed by (ISC)² to be the world’s most-valued cybersecurity certification. According to (ISC)², employers prefer CISSP 3 to 1 over any other credential.

CISSP demonstrates that the certified holder can design, engineer, implement, and run an information security program.

It’s also one of the requirements for employment in IT Security roles at the DoD.

A wide array of IT professionals choose to get CISSP certified, including:

  • CIOs.
  • IT directors.
  • Security systems engineers.
  • And many more.

Once certified, (ISC)² provides a number of member benefits.

From digital badges that let you show off your newly acquired skill set to a free subscription to the bi-monthly newsletter InfoSecurity Professional Magazine. CISSP certification benefits extend beyond just a new job title.

But before you can access these benefits, you’ll have to pass the exam.

What is the CISSP Exam?

You take a look at the CISSP exam outline here.

The exam will take you 6 hours to complete and contains 250 questions. Some are in multiple choice, and some are in “advanced innovative” formats, which are drag-and-drop and “hotspot” type of questions. Here’s a preview of these types of questions from the InfoSec Institute.

There are 8 “domains” that you’ll be tested on, each carrying a different weight in the final score. For example, Security and Risk Management accounts for 15% of your final exam grade, as compared to Asset Security which only accounts for 10%. Knowing this will help you prioritize your study materials.

What Are the CISSP Requirements to Pass the Exam and Get Certified?

The CISSP Requirements to become certified are fairly straightforward.

Out of 1000 points, you have to pass the CISSP exam with a score of 700 or higher.

You also need at least 5 years of full-time work experience in at least 2 of these 8 domains:

  1. Security and Risk Management
  2. Asset Security
  3. Security Architecture and Engineering
  4. Communication and Network Security
  5. Identity and Access Management (IAM)
  6. Security Assessment and Testing
  7. Security Operations
  8. Software Development Security

You can either receive this work experience prior to taking the exam or after. However, if you take the exam without meeting the required 5 years of work experience in at least 2 domains, you will NOT be certified.

Instead, you’ll receive the title Associate of (ISC)². You can leverage this title to gain greater employment and use it become a member of (ISC)² with all the benefits included. Then once you meet the other requirements, you’ll receive your certification.

How Much Does CISSP Cost?

The cost of the CISSP exam is $699.

Once you pass the exam, you have to maintain your membership. Every 3 years, you’ll be required to pay $85 and log 120 continuing professional education (CPE) credits.

How Can You Get Instant Access to CISSP Online Training and Start Preparing for the Exam Today?

If you want to prepare for the CISSP exam and get CISSP certified, then you need access to on-demand online training you can take anytime, anywhere.

To set yourself up for success, you need a whole suite of videos, courses, and ebooks you can use to upgrade your skills and knowledge.

Resources like:

  • Official (ISC)2 Guide to the CISSP CBK Fourth Edition.
  • CISSP: Communication & Network Security Design.
  • CISSP: Identity and Access Management.
  • And many more.

Here’s a preview of what these classes are like so you know what to expect.

And if you want to access all of the available CISSP resources, go ahead and start your free trial of Enterprise Training below.  

Experience the proven, easy-to-use, and cost-effective benefits of online training by scheduling your free online training consultation today!

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Local Government Cybersecurity: It’s (Really) Bad, but You Can Save It

 

local government cybersecurity
Local government cybersecurity is currently highly insecure, but the situation can be improved

Local government cybersecurity is in bad shape, and many local governments are being attacked at an escalating rate as a consequence.

Atlanta’s municipal government was crippled by a ransomware attack.

Baltimore’s 911 dispatch system was hacked by an unknown person or group.

The city of Allentown, Pennsylvania was attacked by malware known as Emotet.

And More than 2,000 Windows-based computers at CDOT offices in Colorado were brought down by a virus known as SamSam.

What do all these attacks have in common?

They all involve local governments and they all happened earlier this year.

Your local government could be next.

To help you prevent a potential attack, we’ll show you why local government cybersecurity is in such poor condition, the top threats local governments face, and a few surefire local government IT solutions you can implement immediately.

How Bad is State and Local Government Cybersecurity?

Really, really bad.

At least, according to the Cybersecurity 2016 Survey conducted by the International City/County Management Association (ICMA), in partnership with the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC).

Here’s what they found:

  • 44% of all respondents said they experience cyberattacks on a daily basis
  • 39.9% of local governments DO NOT catalog and count attacks
  • 66.4% of local governments use an informal system of cybersecurity management, as opposed to a formal system
  • 62.4% of local governments have NO IDEA whether they’re being breached or not
  • 51.3% of local governments say they’re not practicing better cybersecurity because they receive no end-user training whatsoever

These are dismal findings and point to a worrying lack of proactive steps being taken to protect vital information and infrastructure in local governments across the nation.

The most disturbing data-point is the non-existence of cybersecurity training for end-users since end-users are most likely to fall prey to a hacker’s traps and tricks.

Without a formal system of cybersecurity, a record of attacks, and proper cybersecurity training, you’re exposing your agency to a variety of serious cyberthreats.

What are the Greatest Cybersecurity Threats to Local Governments?

We recently listed cybersecurity predictions for 2018 that don’t look good, but we didn’t focus specifically on cyberthreats.

So we looked at what others predict as the greatest cyberthreats to local government. Here are a few we found from OneNeck IT Solutions:

Denial of Service Attack (DDoS)

A DDoS attack is a cyberthreat that attempts to shut down a system or make it inoperable by flooding it with traffic from multiple sources.

Hackers build networks of infected computers, called botnets, by spreading malicious software to machines – allowing them to control those infected computers remotely to carry out a DDoS attack.

This is a favorite attack used against governments. Even the NSA website was brought down by a DDoS attack.

Social Engineering

Social engineering is a catch-all term that refers to various methods of manipulation used against end-users to install malicious malware or steal data.

Phishing is one of the most common forms of social engineering. It relies on fake emails embedded with malicious links that install malware when clicked or fake websites that steal your login information after you’ve entered it.

All forms of social engineering attempt to trick you into giving the hackers control over your machine or access to information they can use to extort your agency.

Advanced Persistent Threats (APT)

APT is a set of continuous computer hacking processes that use stealth tactics to infiltrate your network and remain undetected for as long as it takes to gain access to privileged information and steal sensitive data.

APT attacks may initially use phishing or any other social engineering scam to create one or multiple backdoor entry points, allowing other hackers to worm their way into your network, slowly chipping away at the rest of your IT security layer until they’re discovered or achieve their objective.

How to Improve Government IT Security

The sad state of local government cybersecurity combined with the dangerous cyberthreats they face paints a grim picture for the future, but all is not lost.

There are numerous steps local governments can take to improve IT security across their organization.

Here are some of the most important steps you can take today and into the future:

Perform a Security Assessment

How do you know if your local government is secure?

By inspecting and testing your entire IT infrastructure to identify and secure weaknesses externally and internally.

By knowing your vulnerabilities, you can direct your limited resources to fix the weakest links in your cybersecurity chain.

Work Together with Other Governments

Governments from the federal to the state and local level are under attack from cybercriminals. To beat them, governments need to join forces to share knowledge and resources.

Intergovernmental cooperation strengthens your cybersecurity position by learning from the successes and failures of other governments’ IT security policies while gaining access to experts you may not have in your agency.

Outsource IT Security

Speaking of IT security experts, they’re not always kept in-house. And in many cases, IT experts who are trained to handle the looming threats of today (while anticipating the threats of the future) are difficult to find in the public sector.

That’s why many local governments choose to outsource their IT services.

Plus, since the lack of appropriate funding is often pointed to as one of the biggest reasons why robust cybersecurity in local governments is lacking, it makes sense to hire a private company that will cost far less than hiring in-house staff.

Enable User Access Management

User access management, also called privileged access management (PAM) is a method of controlling what information each team member can access.

Since end-users are typically the weakest cybersecurity links in your organization, and hackers rely on tricking them to gain access to more privileged information, it logically follows that you should restrict end-users’ access to sensitive information whenever possible.

Most people in most positions only need a specific set of data to do their jobs.

Therefore, they should be restricted from accessing any information outside of that core data set to protect your agency from infiltration in the case that an end-user falls victim to a phishing attack, for example.

Adopt the NIST Framework

The NIST Framework provides a common language and systematic methodology for managing cybersecurity risks.

The latest version of the NIST framework was released on April 16, 2018.

According to Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross, “The voluntary NIST Cybersecurity Framework should be every company’s first line of defense. Adopting version 1.1 is a must do for all CEO’s.”

But it’s not just made for the private sector. The NIST Framework has been successfully adopted by federal, State, and local governments.

According to NIST Director Walter G. Copan, “The release of the Cybersecurity Framework Version 1.1 is a significant advance that truly reflects the success of the public-private model for addressing cybersecurity challenges.”

Establish a Cybersecurity Culture

Every employee in your agency should be hyper-vigilant against impending cyberthreats.

It’s not just managers, commissioners, and elected executives who have to worry about these threats. In fact, it’s their job to instill a cybersecurity awareness culture from the top-down.

In the same way that you can create a culture of continuous learning in your agency, you should attempt to create a culture of continuous cybersecurity learning and training in your agency.

Train Your Employees

We’ve been harping heavily on the vulnerability of end-users, which is why the most important cybersecurity tip we can offer you is to train your employees.

There’s no high-tech substitute for smart, safe, and knowledgeable employees. They are your last line of defense against threats.

A hacker can send out all the phishing emails he wants, bypassing all your internet and email security systems. But if none of your employees fall for the scam, your data will remain safe.

So what’s the best way to train your employees in cybersecurity?

Find and use high-quality cybersecurity training resources.

But where can you find cybersecurity training made specifically for local governments?

Right here at Enterprise Training. Below are just a few of the many guides we have available for you.

  • Cyber Threat!: How to Manage the Growing Risk of Cyber Attacks reveals the extent of the cybersecurity problem, and provides a plan to change course and better manage and protect critical information.
  • Cyber Security Culture: Counteracting Cyber Threats through Organizational Learning and Training provides in-depth research to assist managers in forming policies that prevent cyber intrusions, put robust security systems and procedures in place, and arrange appropriate training interventions.
  • The Information Systems Security Officers Guide: Establishing and Managing a Cyber Security Program Third Edition provides information on how to combat the ever-changing myriad of threats security professionals face by presenting practical advice on establishing, managing, and evaluating a successful information protection program in a corporation or government agency.

And here’s a sample video from one of our cybersecurity courses:

If you want these guides and even more cybersecurity training, then contact us below to get started with a free 14-day trial of Enterprise Training.

Experience the proven, easy-to-use, and cost-effective benefits of online training by scheduling your free online training consultation today!

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6 Cybersecurity Predictions for 2018 That Don’t Look Good

 

cybersecurity predictions 2018
Our cybersecurity predictions for 2018 see old threats and new threats rising up

Cybercrime is escalating, and no one is safe.

The costs of data breaches will reach $2.1 trillion globally by 2019, according to Juniper Research.

That’s 4x the estimated cost of data breaches in 2015.

Major corporations like Equifax have been breached while major city Governments like Atlanta were shut down and extorted earlier this year.

Unfortunately, things will get worse before they get better.

Below we list our cybersecurity predictions for 2018 and beyond.

Our hope is that this list will help you identify and guard against increasing cyberattacks.

Top Cybersecurity Predictions for 2018

Simple Password Logins Are Increasingly Risky

81% of hacking-related breaches leveraged either stolen and/or weak passwords, according to the 2017 Data Breach Investigations Report from Verizon.

This trend is predicted to continue if companies and governments don’t use stronger logins such as multi-factor authentication or risk-based authentication.

Cyberattackers Will Rely on AI to Hack Your Data

Why do the work yourself when a computer can do it for you?

That’s exactly what many hackers thought as they began implementing AI-powered cyberattacks.

Here are a few ways hackers can execute attacks using AI:

  • Phishing, spam, and fraud using chatbots
  • AI-powered password hacking
  • AI attacks on AI cybersecurity software

Attacks on IoT Devices Will Rise

It’s only getting easier for hackers to infiltrate the Internet of Things. That’s partly driven by the increasing prevalence of IoT devices.

More than half of major new business processes and systems will incorporate some element of the Internet of Things by 2020, according to Gartner, Inc. This applies to government agencies as well.

The most common method used to hack an IoT device is a botnet – a collection of compromised IoT devices, such as cameras, routers, DVRs, wearables and other embedded technologies, infected with malware.

IoT botnets spread fast, attempting to infect as many devices as possible, potentially compromising hundreds of thousands of machines.

The infamous Reaper botnet infected a million networks alone.

Carefully choosing what IoT devices you use and don’t use is one of the few ways to minimize these types of attacks until security for these devices becomes more robust and effective.

Cyber-Hijacking Will Become More Commonplace

As more transportation systems operate automatically (without safeguarding their software), hackers will be able to hijack their systems remotely and demand a ransom before relinquishing control.

Charlie Miller and Chris Valasek demonstrated their “zero-day exploit” on a Jeep Grand Cherokee back in 2015 – software that lets hackers send commands through the Jeep’s system to its dashboard functions, steering, brakes, and transmission, all from a laptop that may be across the country.

The rise of self-driving cars in the next few years will make this issue even more urgent.

GDPR Will Force Companies and Governments Globally to Strengthen Security or Face Stiff Fines

The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) will come into effect on May 25, 2018 and will mark a new era of mandatory cybersecurity compliance in the EU and across the world.

The GDPR was “designed to harmonize data privacy laws across Europe, to protect and empower all EU citizens data privacy and to reshape the way organizations across the region approach data privacy.”

While the GDPR can be seen as a big step in the right direction, it does scare many businesses and governments globally who are far away from complying with these new regulations.

Some U.S. based companies will fall under the jurisdiction of GDPR if they operate in other countries or target customers in other countries.

And if companies or governments under the jurisdiction of the GDPR don’t report a breach to a regulator within 72 hours, they could face fines of 2-4 percent of global revenue.

State-Sponsored Cyberattacks Will Increase

As cyberattacks become cheaper and easier than traditional warfare, hostile Governments will naturally use them more and more to exploit their rivals’ vulnerabilities.

According to The Hill, “A suspected North Korean hacking campaign has expanded to targets in 17 different countries, including the U.S., pilfering information on critical infrastructure, telecommunications and entertainment organizations, researchers say.

Cybersecurity firm McAfee released new research on the hacking campaign this week, calling it Operation GhostSecret and describing the attackers as having “significant capabilities” to develop and use multiple cyber tools and rapidly expand operations across the globe.”

That’s just one example in a string of examples of States initiating cyberattacks on other States.

Governments must ensure that their networks are isolated from the internet, their systems are extensively checked regularly, and their employees are trained to identify and prevent cyberattacks.

What Can You Do to Guard Against These Cybersecurity Threats in 2018?

Knowing your enemy is only half the battle.

The second half is knowing how to prevent them from attacking you and knowing what to do if you are attacked.

We’ve compiled a few critical resources to help you train your employees and protect your agency against cybercriminals.

  • Cyber Threat!: How to Manage the Growing Risk of Cyber Attacks reveals the extent of the cybersecurity problem, and provides a plan to change course and better manage and protect critical information.
  • Cyber Security Culture: Counteracting Cyber Threats through Organizational Learning and Training provides in-depth research to assist managers in forming policies that prevent cyber intrusions, put robust security systems and procedures in place, and arrange appropriate training interventions.
  • The Information Systems Security Officers Guide: Establishing and Managing a Cyber Security Program Third Edition provides information on how to combat the ever-changing myriad of threats security professionals face by presenting practical advice on establishing, managing, and evaluating a successful information protection program in a corporation or government agency.

And here’s a sample video from one of our cybersecurity courses:

If you want to discover powerful tools, tactics, and strategies for protecting your organization against cyberattacks, then you need to get these critical guides.

How do you get them?

By contacting us directly and getting a free 14-day trial of Enterprise Training below.

Experience the proven, easy-to-use, and cost-effective benefits of online training by scheduling your free online training consultation today!

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8 Cybersecurity Tips Your Employees Need to Know

Every Government agency needs to teach their employees basic cybersecurity tips
Every Government agency needs to teach their employees basic cybersecurity tips

Your Government agency is in danger.

Sam Kim, the Chief Information Officer of Clark County, told Government Technology that “Local Governments are attractive targets [for cybercriminals]…regardless of how big or small you are, you need to be vigilant.”

These remarks underscore the necessity of actionable cybersecurity tips, advice, and knowledge that so many agencies lack.

But it’s not you – IT professionals – that are lacking in this knowledge.

It’s everyone else.

The end user is the most dangerous IT security liability in your agency.

The IBM Security Services 2014 Cyber Security Intelligence Index report found an incredible and disturbing trend:

Of nearly 1,000 clients in 133 countries, over 95% of all cybersecurity incidents involved “human error” as a contributing factor.

According to the report, “The most commonly recorded form of human errors include system misconfiguration, poor patch management, use of default usernames and passwords or easy-to-guess passwords, lost laptops or mobile devices, and disclosure of regulated information via use of an incorrect email address.”

With Cybersecurity Awareness Month beginning in 2 days, it’s the perfect time to help your co-workers brush up on their IT security knowledge.

8 Cybersecurity Tips for Protecting Your Agency

Here are 8 cybersecurity tips that you can use to help the end users in your agency recommit to cybersecurity best practices.

We’ve also included a few ideas on how you can educate your employees on these tips to help you create a basic program for educating, training, and encouraging everyone in your agency to play a proactive role in protecting your organization from cyberattackers.

Create Strong Passwords

This is an essential cybersecurity tip for people who don’t quite understand the nuances of IT security and the risks of an easy-to-hack password.

Let them know that one of the most powerful security organizations in the world, the Department of Homeland Security, specifically suggests these tips:

  • Never use your name, or the names of your kids or pets, or any other easily findable information about yourself
  • Don’t use common passwords
  • Break up your passwords with marks and symbols like @, !, #, 1, 9, etc.
  • Always use a combination of lowercase and uppercase letters

You should also consider implementing a “password change policy” that mandates a routine password change every 45-90 days, with an explicit rule against using the same password over and over again but with a different number or character at the end (we’re sure you’re well aware of THAT guy).

Lock up All Your Devices Whenever You Leave Them

When your employees leave to take a lunch break, go to the bathroom, or go home at the end of the day, you need to make sure they always remember to lock their computer, tablet, phone, or other device that stores sensitive information.

The few minutes it takes for them to grab a snack or smoke a cigarette is just enough time a malicious insider needs to steal valuable data.

There are 2 things you can do to get your employees in the habit of locking their machines:

You can play the “Donuts Game” and/or you can encourage “Goating.”

Both are humorous, fun, and effective ways to get everyone involved in identifying bad security practices.

Be Aware of Phishing Emails

This is an essential and easily forgotten cybersecurity tip:

Be hypervigilant regarding your email and links in your email – you might be getting “phished.”

You have to repeat this over and over and over again to people who don’t live and breathe cybersecurity.

Educate your employees about phishing and tell them that it’s one of the most common email scams out there.

Let them know how it works:

  • The “phisher” poses as a legitimate business, agency, or person and sends you a spoofed message.
  • The message is usually urgent, and the sender will almost always ask you to click on a link to resolve the issue.
  • Once you click on the link, it will either install malware on your device or send you to a spoofed website that steals the information you input into it.

And let them know how to avoid being phished:

  • Double-check the sender to verify it’s an email address you recognize.
  • Look for blatant and consistent spelling errors in the body of the email (this is a hallmark of both spam and phishing emails).
  • Contact the sender directly, either in person or by phone, to verify that they actually sent you an email.

Install an Antivirus

We know some IT security experts don’t use antivirus, while others argue that antivirus is still important.

One thing we can all agree on is that the end user absolutely needs an antivirus because they’re far more likely to engage in riskier behavior than you are.

The 2017 Government Internet Security Threat Report offered a staggering statistic that you could pass on to your employees:

The number of detections of ransomware increased by 36% from 340,000 in 2015 to 463,000 in 2016.

Bottom line:

Don’t allow your employees to work on their machines without the antivirus running, and make sure it’s set to update automatically.

Use a VPN

Setup and strongly encourage the use of a VPN.

Let your employees know how critical a VPN is to their security and safety, especially when accessing data remotely.

Enforce a policy that simply states “every employee must access the company’s network using their VPN.”

Enforce Strict Access Privileges

Your staff should only have access to information that they need to access in order to perform their job functions.

Any access beyond that point puts your agency at risk.

Financial data, other employees’ data, official information, etc. should only be accessed by particular team members and managers.

Use access control on your organization’s intranet, on commonly used software, and on any other work-related programs.

Develop a Disaster Recovery Plan

A disaster recovery plan (DRP) is a set of procedures and resources to control the fallout of an unexpected attack, accident, or disaster.

A good DRP eliminates guesswork and enhances your team’s response effectiveness during an emergency.

To develop a solid plan, make sure to:

  • Take inventory of all your hardware, software, devices, and data
  • Ensure everything is consistently being backed up
  • Ensure you have the appropriate hardware and software required to perform a backup if needed
  • Assign a project manager to oversee the creation and maintenance of your DRP
  • Test your plan regularly to ensure it can appropriately respond to unexpected threats
  • Get your whole team involved in creating and executing your DRP

Provide On-Going Cyber Security Training to Your Staff

Use our cybersecurity tips to begin engaging your employees in an ongoing effort to protect your agency from cyberattackers.

Attempt to cultivate a cybersecurity awareness culture amongst all of your employees. Make it so that it’s not just October when everyone starts practicing good online behavior – they take cybersecurity seriously all year-round

If you want to secure your agency against serious threats, then get serious about training and educating your staff about the importance of cybersecurity.

Of course, only IT professionals need IT exam preparation tips to prepare for certification tests to upgrade their skills and knowledge

But your employees could benefit from formal courses in order to help defend your agency from serious threats.

Now, it’s true that it’s not easy to find good IT security training materials and instructors. And it’s also not easy getting your employees to learn – what with some people preferring microlearning, while others preferring long-form learning.

But the effectiveness and cost of eLearning changes all of this.

Now, you and your non-IT staff can continually educate yourselves and stay up-to-date with the latest threats and threat prevention tools and procedures.

Where can you find all this information?

Right here at Enterprise Training Solutions.

Cybersecurity Tips On-Demand

With videos, ebooks, and courses on topics ranging from phishing to malware to ransomware, we give you access to all the knowledge you need to improve your current security posture and prepare for any future threats.

Experience the proven, easy-to-use, and cost-effective benefits of online training by scheduling your free online training consultation today!

Schedule Free Consultation